Arthur’s Pass 4D

Put on your 4D glasses now.

It’s been a while since I posted some 3D/4D photos. I recently went on a retreat for the Equinox Eclipse Portal to Arthur’s Pass (pueleaz mau ‘puels! yfnos). I didn’t have my 3D cameras but took some snaps on a phone. The quality isn’t great but flying was an opportunity to get shots of the islands from above.

Why are they 4D? Because the images used to give the 3D effect where actually taken seconds apart; TIME is considered the 4th dimension. A 3D picture is usually taken at the same time from slightly different perspectives; each photo representing the two different perspectives of the eyes. As I flew, one photo was taken for the left eye and 2 seconds later another was taken for the right eye. Unless the subject is completely still during the two photos there will be some evidence of time passing. Consider the images of the water flowing. Another example is the photographer and the newly weds. His camera moves from his chest to his eye between shots. The rest of the picture is a convincing 3D photo but his camera moving causes visual dissonance. This can then be played with by blocking the view of one of your eyes with your hand. Now move it to the other eye and back and forth. It creates the illusion of time passing in a simple loop.

The other effect of taking shots from something moving as fast as a plane is that you get more perspective between the eyes. Things at a distance such as that from a flying plane don’t seem to have much depth to them; everything just looks ‘far away’. With a little time to give a little more distance between shots for the left and right eyes a large amount of perspective is gained. If you think the mountains look miniature you can work out why. The two photos taken to make the one image are the same distance apart as the eyes of a giant would be.

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Solar Eclipse November 2012

3D anaglyph by Rev A Slade

We are very fortunate to be prepared for the Solar Eclipse tomorrow. We are in a very good position for viewing it here in Pueleaz Mau but we are going a step further and heading out to sea to view the total eclipse. It is due to peak at 10.30 am NZDT at S 33° W 180°.

Celebrations will begin at 9.30 when the moon begins to enter the sun’s circle. We will be drumming for two hours during the peak and through to 11.30 when the moon has exited the sun’s circle.