Rhythm is Key

For those following the development of the Great Sphere and the Chromatic Spiral here is the latest development.

What happens when Key dictates Rhythm? What if a Tone equals a Crotchet and a Semitone equals a Quaver?
To visualize this the piano keys are set out in a circle like a clock. Starting at 12 o’clock and playing only the white notes, Section 1 shows the major scale and its clockwise (the Standard Bell Pattern) and anti-clockwise rhythms.
Section 2 starts at 9 o’clock revealing the minor scale and rhythms (Ashanti first).
Section 3 and 4 explore the Pentatonic scales and rhythms by playing the black notes from 6 o’clock (Major Pentatonic scale and Son Clave rhythm first) and 3 o’clock (Minor Pentatonic scale).
Section 5 returns to 12 o’clock and tries to make sense of everything we’ve heard and mashes it all together.

For more information on this idea see:
Ethan Hein’s blog post on

Beats and scales

and Godfried Toussaint’s paper http://cgm.cs.mcgill.ca/~godfried/publications/ternary.pdf

Also, have a play with Groove Pizza
https://apps.musedlab.org/groovepizza/?source=pub&museid=rJstjxKX&

Western Chords in the Chromatic Spiral

Here is a new way to view the chromatic spiral. I have added circles of colour corresponding to the notes played to enhance the idea of the colour wheel representing the pitch circle. These large circles overlap and blend. The idea is to associate these blended colours we see with the interval of the two notes we hear.

I am not sure if this works. When we have three notes from opposite sides the three opposing colours blend to white. White is the presence of all colours therefore it should be the sound of not only all notes but all frequencies in between.

However, one experiment remains and that is to use the primary colours in the positions of the tonic, third and fifth. Although, as I type this I cannot imagine this working.

The Vitruvian Pentatonic Scale

Vitruvian Scale

Pythagoras is known as the Father of Music formalizing a system built on ratios and came up with the 7 notes of the octave. Over time we have filled in the gaps with the ‘black keys’. When played separately these five notes form the Pentatonic Scale which is found all over the world in largely indigenous music. Bobby McFerrin explains the Pentatonic scale best here: http://www.ted.com/talks/bobby_mcferrin_hacks_your_brain_with_music

Introduction to the Chromatic Spiral

The 12 music notes (including sharps and flats) are displayed like a clock. As the notes rise in pitch they move around the clock. When they are back at 12 they are they same note only up an octave. (At this stage the soundwave is twice as fast.) This video plays with this idea.

Solstice Full Moon Weekend 2013

We are celebrating the Winter Solstice with a bonfire on the beach at heq s,uofujoyf on Saturday night. The bonfire is there to warm you up after the midwinter swim.

You are welcome to bring your own food, preferably raw vegan food.

Healers will be there including sound healers using didgeridoo and fujara.

It is the full moon on sunday night but we will be drumming on Saturday night around the fire.

Kau Kaka Ora may or may not be making an appearance.

Music in the Great Sphere

The Great Sphere I have been working on is made up of many circles. As part of an investigation into the relationship between colour and the 12 notes of the Western chromatic scale I have found some interesting patterns. One of the patterns is from the relationship between the notes in western music. The major and minor scales have seven notes. The start of each cycle is called an octave. Today I will look at the C major scale. Here is a representation of the scale:

C-Major Scale

C-Major Scale

I have started at C at the top and threaded across the ring jumping thirds each time. From the tonic (C) we go to the major third (E), to the fifth (G), to the seventh (B), to the second (D), to the fourth (F), to the sixth (A) and finally back to the tonic again. One of the reasons I have chosen the C major scale is because it has no sharps or flats, and like a piano layout we can easily spot the groupings. Notice the two pairs of points that are close together, B & C, and E & F. Also where there are dark spaces are the 2 black keys, Db & Eb, and 3 black keys, Gb, Ab and Bb.

For a minor scale all you need to do is turn this asymmetrical seven pointed star 90 degrees:

C-Major Scale with C-Minor Scale underplayed

C-Major Scale with C-Minor Scale underlayed

C-Minor Scale

C-Minor Scale

Getting back to the C major scale, let’s plot the C major chord that has the notes C, E and G:

C-Major chord: C,E and G

C-Major chord: C,E and G

What first struck me when I drew up these lines is something that I had never noticed in my whole life of studying music. Because we are taught to think of the tonic triad as first, third and fifth, that is, two notes up the scale each time,  I had not thought about how many chromatic notes there were between them.  From the tonic (C) to the major third (E) are 4 chromatic notes, from the major third to fifth are 3, and from the fifth to the tonic are 5.

Pythagoras was here

Pythagoras was here

Is this something to do with Pythagoras’ Theorem? No, the numbers do not represent the lengths of the lines but the distance in notes and the angle at the E note is not a right angle. However the numbers 3,4 and 5 are the same and it is this relationship between the notes that we find pleasing. And it is not just the major chord it is also happening in the minor:

Pythagoras minor

Pythagoras minor

It is something that has sparked some interest for me to investigate Pythagoras a little more and in particular the Music of the Spheres.

The final picture today is of the common chords I, IV, V and VI – C major, F major, G major and A minor. The triangle shaped chords are coloured by the colour of the tonic of that chord. The paths that cross are then blended.

The common chords I, IV, V and VI - C major, F major, G major and A minor

The common chords I, IV, V and VI – C major, F major, G major and A minor

So there are quite a few interesting developments so far. The imagery of colours, rings and lines connecting points is inspired from astrology charts and dream catchers. This is the direction of my current study. For the previous post about the Great Sphere click here.

UPDATE: I have just uploaded this video