Chromatic Spiral ~ Harmonic Series 3D

In previous versions of the Chromatic Circle I have introduced depth as a way of portraying pitch of notes but I’ve found it cumbersome. In researching for the Great Sphere I have come across the work of Marysol Gonzallez Sterling and her Biosonic webpage. There I saw the musical spiral amongst other things and it struck me as the obvious answer.

Here is the current version of the Chromatic Scale Spiral 3D as at 2013-05-23. The Spiral will be part of the Great Sphere.

Chromatic Spiral 2

The Spiral is displaying the Harmonic Series here. You can get more details on the Harmonic Series at the Wikipedia page but briefly it is a series of pitches present in all notes and the physics foundation for Western harmonic structure.

First_eight_harmonics_vertical 3D

Each note is another fraction along from the note before. If the low C pictured above is this first line (0-1) then the next C above that is the next line below (1/2). That’s an octave. The next note up is a 1/3 harmonic and lands on the G – the perfect fifth. The 1/4 gives an interval of a perfect fourth which brings us back to C. 1/5 makes a major third taking us to E, 1/6 is a minor third to get us to G and 1/7 is a subminor third to give us Bb. Next, the 1/8 gives us a supermajor second to get us back to C for the fourth time covering three octaves. And it doesn’t stop there.

Anyone with some musical theory knowledge will see that these notes make your standard chord. Although , the further along the series the less standard it is.

693px-Harmonic_partials_on_strings 3D

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Reflections ~ 3D April 2013

The Reverend Arthur Slade is pleased to present his most satisfying 3D photography to date. It was a morning in April after the river had settled down after flooding. The Reverend’s focus has been on reflections, magnification and capturing movement.

These images are intended to be viewed with red/blue 3D glasses. Click on an image to enlarge them in a photo carousel.

For more of the Reverend’s 3D Photography click here

Imagi[c]nation 4D

Here’s a cartoon the Reverend couldn’t resist introducing to the fourth dimension this morning.

1. Use red/blue 3D glasses. View one eye at a time to see two different pictures.
2. If ‘b4’ is green or blue you need to look through the blue lens to see the Before picture. ‘afte’ will then be red so you look through the red lens to see the After picture.

Ideally 4D pictures will have some 3D effect when viewed with both eyes. Unfortunately this one doesn’t.

583536 3DaAs with most images floating around the web it’s hard to find who is the artist. If you can help leave a comment so we can give credit where credit is due.

Here’s another version. This time ‘b4’ is red. Let us know which you prefer.

583536 3Db

Lear 201st Birthday in 3D

Edward Lear, profound bird portrait painter and nonsense writer, was born 201 years ago today.
To celebrate the Reverend Arthur Slade has rendered a few of Lear’s pieces into 3D.

There was an Old Man with a beard,  Who said, "It is just as I feared!— Two Owls and a Hen, four Larks and a Wren,  Have all built their nests in my beard."

There was an Old Man with a beard,
Who said, “It is just as I feared!—
Two Owls and a Hen, four Larks and a Wren,
Have all built their nests in my beard.”

The Owl and the Pussy-Cat went to sea In a beautiful pea-green boat:They took some honey, and plenty of money Wrapped up in a five-pound note.The Owl looked up to the stars above, And sang to a small guitar,"O lovely Pussy, O Pussy, my love, What a beautiful Pussy you are,You are,You are!What a beautiful Pussy you are!"

The Owl and the Pussy-Cat went to sea
In a beautiful pea-green boat:
They took some honey, and plenty of money
Wrapped up in a five-pound note.
The Owl looked up to the stars above,
And sang to a small guitar,
“O lovely Pussy, O Pussy, my love,
What a beautiful Pussy you are, You are, You are!
What a beautiful Pussy you are!”

Pussy said to the Owl, "You elegant fowl, How charmingly sweet you sing!Oh! let us be married; too long we have tarried: But what shall we do for a ring?"They sailed away, for a year and a day, To the land where the bong-tree grows;And there in a wood a Piggy-wig stood, With a ring at the end of his nose, His nose, His nose, With a ring at the end of his nose.

Pussy said to the Owl, “You elegant fowl,
How charmingly sweet you sing!
Oh! let us be married; too long we have tarried:
But what shall we do for a ring?”
They sailed away, for a year and a day,
To the land where the bong-tree grows;
And there in a wood a Piggy-wig stood,
With a ring at the end of his nose, His nose, His nose,
With a ring at the end of his nose.

"Dear Pig, are you willing to sell for one shilling Your ring?" Said the Piggy, "I will."So they took it away, and were married next day By the Turkey who lives on the hill.  They dined on mince and slices of quince, Which they ate with a runcible spoon;And hand in hand, on the edge of the sand, They danced by the light of the moon,The moon,The moon,They danced by the light of the moon.

“Dear Pig, are you willing to sell for one shilling
Your ring?” Said the Piggy, “I will.”
So they took it away, and were married next day
By the Turkey who lives on the hill.
They dined on mince and slices of quince,
Which they ate with a runcible spoon;
And hand in hand, on the edge of the sand,
They danced by the light of the moon, The moon, The moon,
They danced by the light of the moon.

Music in the Great Sphere

The Great Sphere I have been working on is made up of many circles. As part of an investigation into the relationship between colour and the 12 notes of the Western chromatic scale I have found some interesting patterns. One of the patterns is from the relationship between the notes in western music. The major and minor scales have seven notes. The start of each cycle is called an octave. Today I will look at the C major scale. Here is a representation of the scale:

C-Major Scale

C-Major Scale

I have started at C at the top and threaded across the ring jumping thirds each time. From the tonic (C) we go to the major third (E), to the fifth (G), to the seventh (B), to the second (D), to the fourth (F), to the sixth (A) and finally back to the tonic again. One of the reasons I have chosen the C major scale is because it has no sharps or flats, and like a piano layout we can easily spot the groupings. Notice the two pairs of points that are close together, B & C, and E & F. Also where there are dark spaces are the 2 black keys, Db & Eb, and 3 black keys, Gb, Ab and Bb.

For a minor scale all you need to do is turn this asymmetrical seven pointed star 90 degrees:

C-Major Scale with C-Minor Scale underplayed

C-Major Scale with C-Minor Scale underlayed

C-Minor Scale

C-Minor Scale

Getting back to the C major scale, let’s plot the C major chord that has the notes C, E and G:

C-Major chord: C,E and G

C-Major chord: C,E and G

What first struck me when I drew up these lines is something that I had never noticed in my whole life of studying music. Because we are taught to think of the tonic triad as first, third and fifth, that is, two notes up the scale each time,  I had not thought about how many chromatic notes there were between them.  From the tonic (C) to the major third (E) are 4 chromatic notes, from the major third to fifth are 3, and from the fifth to the tonic are 5.

Pythagoras was here

Pythagoras was here

Is this something to do with Pythagoras’ Theorem? No, the numbers do not represent the lengths of the lines but the distance in notes and the angle at the E note is not a right angle. However the numbers 3,4 and 5 are the same and it is this relationship between the notes that we find pleasing. And it is not just the major chord it is also happening in the minor:

Pythagoras minor

Pythagoras minor

It is something that has sparked some interest for me to investigate Pythagoras a little more and in particular the Music of the Spheres.

The final picture today is of the common chords I, IV, V and VI – C major, F major, G major and A minor. The triangle shaped chords are coloured by the colour of the tonic of that chord. The paths that cross are then blended.

The common chords I, IV, V and VI - C major, F major, G major and A minor

The common chords I, IV, V and VI – C major, F major, G major and A minor

So there are quite a few interesting developments so far. The imagery of colours, rings and lines connecting points is inspired from astrology charts and dream catchers. This is the direction of my current study. For the previous post about the Great Sphere click here.

UPDATE: I have just uploaded this video

2D Preview of the 12 Colour Wheel

RAS Working on Chart smallHappy D’Moonday to you. I hope you had a great breakfast. Here is a sneak peek at the 12 Colour Wheel that the Reverend is working on. It’s not quite finished and it’s still in it’s 2D state.

Colour Wheel smallThe  Reverend is still unsure how it will end up but it is big!